How Pregnant Lawyers in Miami are Responding to Zika

Attorney Megan Wells was interviewed for an article featured on Law.com. Here is an excerpt from the article:

On top of managing litigation caseloads and expanding families, pregnant lawyers in the Miami area are figuring out how to manage the risks of living and working so close to a neighborhood the CDC has warned expectant mothers away from after an outbreak of the Zika virus.

For Miami Lakes-based family law solo practitioner Megan Wells, the precaution of choice is wearing multiple mosquito-repellent bracelets on her ankles and wrists whenever outside. Not a look that goes well with a business suit. At 28-weeks pregnant, Wells is just at the time when, according to what she has read, the baby is less at risk of damage if she does contract the Zika virus. But with reports of 14 Zika cases in her area, Wells isn’t taking any chances. She has stopped taking evening walks or sitting out on her balcony.

Click Here for Full Article

Child Custody Evaluations: Do’s and Don’ts for Parents

July 20, 2016. Information Provided by: divorcenet.com

If you’re in the midst of a child custody battle, you may be dealing with a custody evaluation as part of the court process. As you proceed through the evaluation, there are some important dos and don’ts to remember:

Do:

  • Acknowledge both your strengths and your weaknesses as a parent.
  • Be truthful in answering questions about your history and current situation.
  • Keep your focus on your children’s well-being and what’s best for them.
  • Follow up promptly and thoroughly if you’re asked to provide paperwork or information.

Don’t:

  • Say negative things about your spouse.
  • Coach your kids about what to say or do.
  • Be late or miss appointments with the evaluator.
  • Disobey custody orders that are in place while the evaluation is pending.

Click here to see more

Child Custody Procedures

July 20, 2016. Information Provided by: statelaws.findlaws.com

One of the more contentious issues in a divorce can be the battle over who gets custody of the children from the marriage.

Oftentimes, parents are able to work out a mutually agreeable solution, known as a “parenting plan,” for the custody of the children. If parents cannot reach an agreement on child custody themselves, a Florida family court can make a decision based on evaluating what is in the best interests of the child.

Ultimately, the court will issue a custody order which will dictate how, when and under what circumstances the parents of the child have custody or visitation rights with their child.

Click here to see more

Thinking about divorce? Pre-divorce steps you can take

June 3, 2016. Information Provided by: FloridaLawHelp.org

 1. Get help to try and save your marriage. If you are thinking about getting a divorce, take time to consider whether or not the marriage can be saved.  

2. Get a pro to help you talk to your kids. Whether or not you decide to try counseling for your marriage or yourself, you should seriously consider talking to a mental health professional if you have children and are planning to divorce.  

3. Get your papers together. Gather information about your finances and belongings before you meet with a lawyer.  

4. Think about working together first. Consult with an attorney first to advise you the best route to take.  

5. Think before you post. You should not write anything or put any photograph on social media that you would not want the judge who ends up deciding your divorce case to read or see.  

Click here to see more

Enforcement of Child Support

June 3, 2016. Information Provided by findlaw.com

The district attorney can impose various consequences for failure to pay child support, some include:

  • Withholding federal tax refunds and using these funds to pay child support
  • Garnishing wages
  • Seizing property
  • Revoking the delinquent payer’s driver’s license

Furthermore, the U.S. Department of State can even deny issuance of a passport to someone who owes more than $2,500 in child support. As mentioned, if the delinquent payer still fails to pay, the court can hold him or her in contempt of court (for failing to follow a court order) and impose a jail term.

Click here to see more